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A team of Mines professors have received National Science Foundation funding to develop computational tools to predict COVID-19 infections at individual and population levels.
Winning the semester-long design challenge – and the $1,000 grand prize – was a solution to optimize mosquito collection in order to improve identification accuracy and reduce the threat of mosquito-borne diseases.
Atomically thin particles – described that way because they are typically only 1-3 atoms thick – are of interest to scientists because of the unique properties that such small thickness creates.
The honor, which recognizes the Mines doctoral graduate whose thesis demonstrates the greatest potential for societal impact, was presented during Spring 2020 Graduate Commencement on May 8.
The virtual ceremony included many of Mines’ cherished traditions and new features aimed at helping the community feel connected during this challenging time.
The Make Masks for Mines effort is seeking volunteers with the skill, will and sewing machines to make masks as soon as possible. Local volunteers can also schedule a time to pick up Mines-furnished fabric for the project.
Electrical engineering freshman Grant Kahl hopes the automated Ambu bag-ventilation system can be used in health care settings around the world where traditional-style ventilators are unavailable, too costly or too cumbersome.
Undergraduate Commencement will begin at 10 a.m. MT, with a live broadcast featuring many of Mines’ cherished traditions as well as new features aimed at helping the community feel connected during this challenging time.
In Antarctica, Greenland and the Canadian Arctic, Geophysics Assistant Professor Matt Siegfried studies how glaciers and ice sheets move and evolve.
Rob '68 and Ann McKee hope their gift to create the new scholars program will inspire others to contribute to reducing student debt.