Humanities & Design


Charles Shultz ’61 and his wife, Louanne, have provided a generous gift to Mines’ Humanitarian Engineering program to support the program’s continued growth, reach and impact inside and outside the university.
The J. Don ’55 and Lois Thorson Capstone Lab will provide a dedicated space for Capstone Design@Mines projects.
One of the earliest cyberattacks on a university happened right here at Colorado School of Mines more than 20 years ago. It was this attack that inspired Elizabeth Van Wie Davis, professor of international politics and policy in the Division of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, to write her newest book, “Shadow Warfare: Cyberwar Policy in the United States, Russia, and China.”
Winning the semester-long design challenge was a solution to improve adherence to COVID-19 capacity limits in restaurants, retail stores and other spaces.
Gracie Cole '20 tells us about her Capstone Design project—converting her 1979 VW bus from gas to electric.
Re-Volt’s goal was to retain the van’s road trip and car camping capabilities while aiming for a 250-mile range and comfortable highway cruising speed of 70 mph.
The coronavirus pandemic prevented the world from holding its annual meeting to continue moving the Paris Agreement forward this fall, but Mines students pressed ahead in their place. In an end-of
Mines’ newest cohort of University Innovation Fellows have an ambitious agenda to promote positive change on campus – including plans to establish a dedicated creative space where students could unwind and collaborate on artistic endeavors.
The six Mines students will serve as program ambassadors for humanitarian engineering and will seek out new opportunities for collaboration with faculty, alumni, corporations and non-governmental organizations.
“A growing number of engineers and scientists want to understand how their work can contribute to broad social and environmental goals," program director Jessica Smith said.