Biosciences


"We started this company with a focus on resolving diabetic foot ulcers, which pose serious health and financial burdens to those affected, but also believe the unique properties of our hydrogels may have broader applicability in wound healing," said Melissa Krebs, associate professor of chemical and biological engineering.
A mechanical engineering professor at Colorado School of Mines is part of a team of researchers working on better ways to detect concussions and more protective equipment to prevent them.
Mines' Anne Silverman is collaborating with the U.S. Naval Health Research Center on work to better understand and reduce injury risk among U.S. service members.
An expert in musculoskeletal biomechanics, Silverman joined the Mines faculty in 2011.
Through these projects and others, Mines faculty and students are giving Mines an upper hand in responding to the pandemic and its challenges.
The new initiative is bringing together more than 50 early-career scientists from the U.S. and Canada to tackle the pressing challenge of greenhouse gas accumulating in Earth’s atmosphere and oceans.
Colloidal chains that can mimic the swimming and crawling movements of real organisms could have have a significant benefit to the development of in vivo targeted drug delivery systems.
A team of Mines professors have received National Science Foundation funding to develop computational tools to predict COVID-19 infections at individual and population levels.
Melissa Krebs, associate professor in chemical and biological engineering, explains how hydrogel bandages can improve the healing time in diabetic wounds.
“Current products on the market for diabetic foot ulcers are not meeting the clinical need," Chemical & Biological Engineering Associate Professor Melissa Krebs said.