Biomedical Engineering


"We started this company with a focus on resolving diabetic foot ulcers, which pose serious health and financial burdens to those affected, but also believe the unique properties of our hydrogels may have broader applicability in wound healing," said Melissa Krebs, associate professor of chemical and biological engineering.
A mechanical engineering professor at Colorado School of Mines is part of a team of researchers working on better ways to detect concussions and more protective equipment to prevent them.
Mines' Anne Silverman is collaborating with the U.S. Naval Health Research Center on work to better understand and reduce injury risk among U.S. service members.
Melissa Krebs, associate professor in chemical and biological engineering, explains how hydrogel bandages can improve the healing time in diabetic wounds.
“Current products on the market for diabetic foot ulcers are not meeting the clinical need," Chemical & Biological Engineering Associate Professor Melissa Krebs said.
Breaking the mold is the bread and butter of Human Centered Design Studio, a two-semester capstone course at Mines focused on developing adaptive equipment for people (and sometimes animals) with disabilities.
As medical care becomes more personalized, Mines researchers are forging ahead in the field by developing nano-sized biotechnology that was once the stuff of science fiction.
Expanding its presence in the health-tech sector and the city of Denver, Colorado School of Mines will join Catalyst HTI, a first-of-its-kind health care innovation hub opening this summer that will
Colorado School of Mines researchers in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering have developed magnetic “microlassos” no longer than the width of a human hair that could be used to
Andrew Petruska, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Colorado School of Mines, has been selected to receive the Boettcher Foundation’s Webb-Waring Biomedical Research Award. Petruska is