Physics


A new $15 million interdisciplinary research institute led by Colorado School of Mines aims to create new theoretically grounded and experimentally validated approaches and tools to design and discover dynamical materials and structures while solving long-standing scientific challenges in the dynamical response of materials.
“Quantum technologies are poised to revolutionize how we compute, communicate and sense and this requires engineers that have an interdisciplinary education,” Mines' Peter Aaen said.
The Rocky Mountain Industrial Assessment Center will result in shared courses where students from both institutions can learn about how to improve energy efficiency in the building and manufacturing industry.
Researchers will develop a first-of-its-kind quantum simulator that could be used to develop novel materials and, in the future, lead to the development of a high-performance quantum computer.
A new quantum engineering minor at Colorado School of Mines will give undergraduate students the opportunity to gain exposure to quantum theory and hands-on experience with relevant hardware and prepare for careers in the rapidly evolving field of quantum technology.
Meenakshi Singh, assistant professor of physics at Colorado School of Mines, explains why we’re seeing a quantum surge, what this evolving technology will enable us to do in the near future and how Mines is preparing the next generation to lead the world through the next quantum revolution.
“Quantum information science and technology (QIST) is at a crucial juncture,” said Carr, a professor of physics at Colorado School of Mines.
Acting as “artificial atoms,” quantum dots are used in widely ranging contexts, from tests of molecule formation to quantum computing.
A rapidly advancing research area, spintronics explores methods to exploit a property of electrons to encode information faster and in a more energy efficient fashion than conventional computing electronics.
The goal of the two-day NSF Workshop on Quantum Engineering Education on Feb. 25-26 is to build a roadmap to establishing the robust and diverse student pipeline and educational infrastructure that the U.S. and its businesses need to lead the quantum revolution.