Physics


Meenakshi Singh, assistant professor of physics at Colorado School of Mines, explains why we’re seeing a quantum surge, what this evolving technology will enable us to do in the near future and how Mines is preparing the next generation to lead the world through the next quantum revolution.
“Quantum information science and technology (QIST) is at a crucial juncture,” said Carr, a professor of physics at Colorado School of Mines.
Acting as “artificial atoms,” quantum dots are used in widely ranging contexts, from tests of molecule formation to quantum computing.
A rapidly advancing research area, spintronics explores methods to exploit a property of electrons to encode information faster and in a more energy efficient fashion than conventional computing electronics.
The goal of the two-day NSF Workshop on Quantum Engineering Education on Feb. 25-26 is to build a roadmap to establishing the robust and diverse student pipeline and educational infrastructure that the U.S. and its businesses need to lead the quantum revolution.
“Hybrid perovskite photovoltaics are one of the most promising new technologies and have made gains in champion cell performance at astronomical rates. However, stability remains a show-stopper for the technology,” said Angus Rockett, professor and head of the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department.
In findings published last week in the journal Physical Review Letters, an interdisciplinary team led by Mines and Lawrence Livermore National Lab demonstrated the power of using nuclear decay in high-rate quantum sensors.
A Mines alumnus, Squier was recognized for his “seminal contributions to ultrafast optical technology, including the first ultrafast Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier," among other accomplishments.
Led by Physics Associate Professor Eliot Kapit, Mines researchers will contribute to the center’s quantum computer design on multiple fronts.
Spencer Fretwell will be working with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Dr. Stephan Friedrich, deputy leader of the laboratory’s Rare Event Detection group.