Mechanical engineering


Why did you choose to come to Mines? What have you enjoyed most about being here? Mines is one of the most reputable engineering schools in the nation, which is what attracted my attention in the
The Alliance for the Development of Additive Processing Technologies (ADAPT) at Colorado School of Mines was part of an international research team that developed a new elastocaloric cooling material
"Bat vision” for first responders would represent a major advancement in mine rescue technology. Andrew Petruska, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, tells us more in this video.
A Colorado School of Mines professor has been awarded a $600,000 grant from the U.S. Army Research Office for work designing a new class of multi-layered nanocomposites that exhibit unprecedented
Why did you choose to come to Mines? What have you enjoyed most about being here? First and foremost, I believe Mines has tremendous value as an educational institution. I am fully confident that both
Hao Zhang, assistant professor of computer science, and an interdisciplinary team of researchers are building a smart robot to inspect and repair power plant boilers.
Developing machine learning-enabled acoustic imaging for first responders will represent a major advancement in mine rescue, which is surprisingly low-tech in some ways.
Breaking the mold is the bread and butter of Human Centered Design Studio, a two-semester capstone course at Mines focused on developing adaptive equipment for people (and sometimes animals) with disabilities.
Tell us about your recent internship. What excited you about it and what did you do? This summer, I worked with Canvas Technology (which was acquired by Amazon Robotics right before I started). The
Mechanical Engineering Associate Professor Xiaoli Zhang is the lead researcher on a $1 million National Science Foundation project to create an AI-enabled tool for retraining workers in the metals industries.