by
Emilie Rusch

Mines to launch graduate program in quantum engineering

“Quantum technology could revolutionize computing, communication, sensing and more, but critical workforce shortages are threatening to hamper progress,” said Eliot Kapit, associate professor of physics.
Physics Professor Meenakshi Singh in the lab with a student

A new interdisciplinary graduate program at Colorado School of Mines will prepare engineers and scientists to contribute to the growing field of quantum technology – without the four- to six-year time commitment of earning a PhD.

Starting in Fall 2020, Mines will offer graduate certificates and thesis/non-thesis master’s degrees in Quantum Engineering, with specialization tracks in hardware and software.

“Quantum technology could revolutionize computing, communication, sensing and more, but critical workforce shortages are threatening to hamper progress,” said Eliot Kapit, associate professor of physics. “You don’t need a PhD to make an impact in quantum engineering – you need quantum literacy, and this program is designed to bring students and working professionals up to speed on key concepts needed by industry today, including cryogenic equipment operation, programming quantum systems and quantum optics setup and operation.”

Core courses in the Quantum Engineering program will focus on four areas: the fundamentals of quantum information, quantum many-body physics, quantum programming and low-temperature microwave measurements for quantum information. Students will also get unique access to cutting-edge quantum instruments, including helium-cooled units and device measurements using microwave network analyzers, spectrum and signal analyzers.

“Students in this program will have a rare opportunity to get hands-on experience with helium-cooled units and low-temperature microwave measurement, key technologies for virtually all solid-state quantum computing systems,” Provost Richard Holz said. “Few programs in the world offer this sort of training in a classroom setting. Mines has made a major investment in recent years into growing the breadth and reach of its quantum research and this program is a natural next step.”

Teaching the program’s core courses will be an interdisciplinary group of faculty members from Physics, Computer Science and Electrical Engineering. The 12-credit graduate certificate will comprise the four core classes, with the only prerequisite being linear algebra.

For more information about graduate admissions at Mines, go to https://www.mines.edu/graduate-admissions/.

Emilie Rusch

Emilie Rusch

News Director
303-273-3361
About Mines
Colorado School of Mines is a public research university focused on science and engineering, where students and faculty together address the great challenges society faces today - particularly those related to the Earth, energy and the environment.