by
Emilie Rusch

Earth Observation Group wins Galileo Award from International Dark-Sky Association

The annual award is given in recognition of outstanding achievements in research or academic work on light pollution over a multiple-year period.
Nighttime lights image

The Earth Observation Group at Colorado School of Mines has been honored with the 2019 Galileo Award from the International Dark-Sky Association.

The award is given in recognition of outstanding achievements in research or academic work on light pollution over a multiple-year period.

Mines' Chris Elvidge, center, receives the 2019 Galileo Award.

Earth Observation Group Director Chris Elvidge and Senior Research Associate Kimberly Baugh have been producing satellite images of Earth at night for more than two decades. The images have been a critical component of many scientific analyses – including “The World Atlas of the Artificial Night Sky Brightness” sky glow maps – and also provide valuable insights on gas flaring and volcanic activity, illegal fishing, power outages and electrification, and geomagnetism.

Formerly of NOAA, the Earth Observation Group joined the Payne Institute for Public Policy at Mines in 2018.

Elvidge, Baugh and colleagues were honored during the International Dark-Sky Association 2019 Annual General meeting on Nov. 8 in Tucson, Arizona.

The International Dark-Sky Association is the recognized authority on light pollution and is the leading organization combating light pollution worldwide.

Emilie Rusch

Emilie Rusch

Public Information Specialist
303-273-3361
About Mines
Colorado School of Mines is a public research university focused on science and engineering, where students and faculty together address the great challenges society faces today - particularly those related to the Earth, energy and the environment.