Faculty


Meenakshi Singh, assistant professor of physics at Colorado School of Mines, explains why we’re seeing a quantum surge, what this evolving technology will enable us to do in the near future and how Mines is preparing the next generation to lead the world through the next quantum revolution.
Williams will receive $549,999 over five years for his project, “Cognitively-Informed Memory Models for Language-Capable Robots,” which will apply lessons from cognitive psychology in hopes of developing working memory processes in robots.
“Quantum information science and technology (QIST) is at a crucial juncture,” said Carr, a professor of physics at Colorado School of Mines.
Under Sava's leadership, the Mines Geophysics Department will continue to look for opportunities to expand the breadth of its research into new areas, everything from construction monitoring to nondestructive materials testing to Arctic research to space resources.
John Bradford, vice president for global initiatives at Colorado School of Mines, discusses the new Global Energy Future Initiative.
Acting as “artificial atoms,” quantum dots are used in widely ranging contexts, from tests of molecule formation to quantum computing.
A rapidly advancing research area, spintronics explores methods to exploit a property of electrons to encode information faster and in a more energy efficient fashion than conventional computing electronics.
Carolyn Ann Koh, William K. Coors Distinguished Chair and professor of chemical and biological engineering, has been honored with two prestigious international awards: The Institution of Chemical
Colorado School of Mines researchers have been awarded $6.3 million by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop and demonstrate a potentially transformative system to harness and distribute geothermal
Angel Abbud Madrid, director of the Center for Space Resources at Colorado School of Mines, shares the importance of discovering and utilizing resources in space.