Space Resources


“For Mines to win the medal count really cements our position in this industry,” Professor George Sowers said. “The team that won the overall prize was a pretty large aerospace corporation – we had graduate students that went toe to toe with a professional company.”
Colorado School of Mines, in partnership with Lockheed Martin Space, announce a new global student design challenge open to student teams from any accredited university worldwide.
A team of Colorado School of Mines students have received funding from NASA to design and test a near-term solution to one of the biggest (smallest) challenges to future lunar exploration: Moon dust.
A Colorado School of Mines graduate student is developing a new lunar payload that could be deployed to otherwise inaccessible areas of the Moon.
Angel Abbud Madrid, director of the Center for Space Resources at Colorado School of Mines, shares the importance of discovering and utilizing resources in space.
Three new minors will give undergraduate students more ways to tailor their Mines experience to serve their interests and career ambitions. Aerospace engineering, space mining and teaching minors will
Researchers at Mines, Honeybee Robotics, NASA’s Johnson Space Center and Pioneer Astronautics will build and demonstrate hardware to produce oxygen and steel from lunar regolith.
"If we can build this thing, we’ll be able to have unlimited access to the shadowed regions of the Moon," said Ross Centers, a student in Mines' Space Resources Program.
The new programs draw from the core areas of expertise Mines is known for — from civil and environmental engineering to extraction to materials science — to create an interdisciplinary field of study that prepares students for the next step in their careers.
Claire Thomas, one of 40 members of the Brooke Owens Fellowship Class of 2020, will spend 10 weeks working at Made in Space, a company developing manufacturing technology for space, and receive mentorship from aerospace industry veterans.