Announcements

May
01
2017

Prasad named Honorary Member of Geophysical Society of Houston

Manika Prasad, professor of petroleum engineering, was awarded Honorary Membership to the Geophysical Society of Houston for distinguished contributions to the geophysical profession. The Society recognized Prasad’s impacts in rock physics and rock mechanics including:·         Acoustic properties of heavy oils and heavy oil reservoirs·         Contributions to the research produced by the Center for Rock Abuse Fluids Consortium·         Seismic techniques in unconventional shale reservoirs through the OCLASSH Consortium. The award will be presented at a Honors and Awards Banquet on May 4th in Houston. Announcement
Apr
24
2017

Eustes wins ASME Petroleum Division Ross Kastor Award

Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering Alfred "Bill" Eustes is the 2017 recipient of the Ross Kastor Educator's Award. Given by the Petroleum Division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this award recognizes dedication to improving engineering and science awareness for students and the enhancement of education for future leaders. The award will be presented at the division's Annual Awards Dinner on May 1, 2017. Announcement
Apr
18
2017

Mines ranked fifth in the nation for return on investment

Colorado School of Mines has been ranked fifth in the nation for return on tuition investment 20 years after graduation in the PayScale 2017 College ROI Report.PayScale pegged the 20-year net return on investment for Mines graduates at $883,000 by calculating the difference between 20 years of median pay for a bachelor's degree holder and 24 years of media pay for a high school graduate, minus four years of in-state tuition totaling $123,000.Mines students paying out-of-state tuition of $188,000 over four years can still expect a 20-year net ROI of $818,000, good for 11th in the country.Mines was topped only by the United States Merchant Marine Academy, Harvey Mudd College, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and SUNY - Maritime College in the rankings.Colorado School of Mines was recently ranked number one in Colorado in value for the second straight year, and 13th in the nation, by financial technology company Smart Asset. A recent study by Business First ranked Mines as the 18th best public college in the country and the best in the state. Announcement
Apr
10
2017

Engineering physics student awarded American Council of Engineering Companies of Colorado scholarship

Colorado School of Mines engineering physics student Katherine Schneider has been awarded a $3,000 scholarship by the American Council of Engineering Companies of Colorado. Schneider received the Sandy Donnel Memorial Scholarship, which recognizes an engineering student for outstanding community service. Schneider has been involved in the Boy Scouts of America Western Region and tutors and mentors K-12 students. The scholarship was established in 2015 to honor ACEC Colorado’s executive director of 25 year Announcement
Feb
17
2017

Fleckenstein selected as SPE Distinguished Lecturer for 2017-2018

  Adjunct Professor of Petroleum Engineering Will Fleckenstein has been selected as the Society of Petroleum Engineers Distinguished Lecturer for the 2017-2018 season.    “I’m deeply honored and humbled to be chosen as a Society of Petroleum Engineers Distinguished Lecturer for the 2017-18 season,” said Fleckenstein.  “I look forward to the opportunity to give my talk to diverse audiences in the US and around the world about the sustainability of unconventional development in the context of protecting aquifers from subsurface contamination. I anticipate robust and spirited discussions after my lecture with both those that support development and those that are skeptical.”    Fleckenstein’s talk is titled “Shale Development – Does Cheap Energy Really Mean Flaming Tap Water?”. The lecture will examine the risk of contamination of aquifers through well-bores, primarily based on a comprehensive three-year study funded by the National Science Foundation. Shale development in the US has been ongoing for at least the last decade, and many lessons can be learned from the US experience to help prevent air emissions and aquifer contamination in future developments around the world.    The SPE Distinguished Lecturer program was created in 1961. Each year, the SPE Distinguished Lecturer Committee selects a group of professionals from various disciplines, nominated by their peers, to share their knowledge and expertise with SPE members through visits to SPE sections worldwide. More than 450 presentations are offered each year, and each section can receive up to three lectures per year.   Contact: Agata Bogucka, Communications Manager, College of Earth Resource Sciences & Engineering | 303-384-2657 | abogucka@mines.edu   Announcement
Feb
07
2017

CBE's Carolyn Koh recognized for Department of Energy task force work

Chemical and Biological Engineering Professor Carolyn Koh, who holds the William K. Coors Distinguished Chair, has been recognized for her service on the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board's Task Force on Methane Hydrates. "During my tenure as secretary, SEAB has been prolific in providing sound, actionable advice on various topics of importance to DOE and its mission objectives," said Ernest Moriz in a letter to Koh dated January 15, 2017. Moriz served as secretary of energy under President Barack Obama from May 2013 to January 2017. "Your work provided a framework for DOE's pre-commercial methan hydrate research efforts and encouraged strengthening industry engagement through our advisory committee and continuing international collaborations," Moriz said. Koh is a leading expert on the study of natural gas hydrates, compounds in which a large amount of methane can be trapped within a crystal structure of water, forming ice-like solids. These gas hydrate solids present a potential hazard to the oil and gas industries when they form in underwater flowlines, and also have potential applications in energy recovery, transport, and storage. Koh was one of 10 members of the task force, which issued its report in January 2016. The task force found that extracting methane from hydrate reservoirs could mean less carbon emissions than other fossil sources. They recommended that the Department of Energy continue to fund research into methane hydrates, with one-third devoted to fundamental science and the rest used for U.S. participation in international hydrates activities. The group also recommended increased engagement with industry and academia, and that research priority for field experiments be placed on questions involving the production of hydrates, such as understanding the instabilities that can arise during production. Announcement
Jan
23
2017

MME PhD candidate awarded scholarship for recycling research

Thomas Boundy, a PhD candidate in metallurgical and materials engineering, has been awarded the Recycling Research Foundation's 2016 National Scholarship. Boundy's graduate research is focused on developing a flow sheet that would enable the economical recycling of indium (a rare metal critical to solar panel manufacturing) from cell phones, computer monitors, and television screens. The scholarship awards $5,000 to a student seeking a graduate degree in a field that supports the scrap processing and recycling industry. The Recycling Research Foundation, a nonprofit closely associated with the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, seeks to promote the art and science of scrap processing and recycling through research, sponsorships, technical assistance and educational programs. "The Recycling Research Foundation is proud to honor Thomas Boundy with this scholarship as he pursues an education that will well-prepare him for a future in the recycling industry," said ISRI President Robin Wiener. "One of the goals of this scholarship is to generate interest in recycling careers and there is no doubt that with the knowledge he gains from his education, Thomas will be able to make significant long-lasting contributions to the recycling industry." "I am grateful to be awarded the Recycling Research Foundation’s National Graduate Scholarship and for the support it provides for those seeking higher education that I fully expect will improve the nation’s scrap processing capabilities," said Boundy, who is advised by Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Professor Patrick Taylor. Announcement
Jan
10
2017

Lange receives Department of Energy grant

Dr. Ian Lange, assistant professor with the Division of Economics and Business and director of the Mineral and Energy Economics program, was awarded funding from the Department of Energy in conjunction with Resources for the Future to study the impact of federal coal leasing policy on (non-federal) Eastern coal mine operations. The proposed project will determine whether existing coal mines close prematurely due to leasing and permitting factors for new mines. The analysis will compare mines located on different land tenure (federal, state, and private), with differential access to power plants (minemouth, competition from other basins), and under different economic conditions (price of substitute fuels, number of plant retirements). A number of measures of mine health will be utilized (productivity, current recoverable reserves, proxies for investments made) as indicators for the economic health of the mine which are tied to closing decisions. Announcement
Jan
05
2017

Materials science PhD student receives Goldstein Scholar Award

John Mangum, a PhD candidate in materials science, has been awarded the Goldstein Scholar Award, which will help fund his travel to North Carolina State University to study Ti valence states at atomic scale using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The award, sponsored by the Meteoritical Society and Springer, seeks to promote career advancement for early career members of the Microanalysis Society, increase interactions of junior and established microanalysts, and advance microanalysis measurements. Mangum is advised by Brian Gorman, associate professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, and is a member of the Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics. Announcement
Dec
20
2016

Enders named 2016 recipient of SEG Ralph W. Marsden Award

Interim Department Head in Geology and Geological Engineering M. Stephen Enders has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Ralph W. Marsden Award by the Society of Economic Geologists. This award recognizes significant volunteer contributions to the Society, of which Enders has been a member for 35 years.  Enders received his bachelor's degree from Colorado School of Mines, going on to receive master's and doctoral degrees from the University of Arizona. After over 35 years working in the industry, Enders returned to Mines in 2009 to join the Department of Mining Engineering as a research professor. He was named Interim Department Head of Geology and Geological Engineering in 2016. His numerous leadership experience within SEG includes: President of the SEG Foundation in 2007, President of the Society in 2011, International Exchange Lecturer in 2007 and Fundraising Chairman for the SEG 2016 Conference in Cesme, Turkey. He is currently an SEG Honorary Lecturer and Chairman of the Organizing Committee for the SEG 2018 Conference to be held in Keystone, Colorado.   The Ralph. W. Marsden award will be presented to Enders at the 2017 SEG Conference, to be held in Beijing, China September 17-20, 2017.   Contact: Agata Bogucka, Communications Manager, College of Earth Resource Sciences & Engineering | 303-384-2657 | abogucka@mines.edu Announcement

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