Announcements

Feb
17
2017

Fleckenstein selected as SPE Distinguished Lecturer for 2017-2018

  Adjunct Professor of Petroleum Engineering Will Fleckenstein has been selected as the Society of Petroleum Engineers Distinguished Lecturer for the 2017-2018 season.    “I’m deeply honored and humbled to be chosen as a Society of Petroleum Engineers Distinguished Lecturer for the 2017-18 season,” said Fleckenstein.  “I look forward to the opportunity to give my talk to diverse audiences in the US and around the world about the sustainability of unconventional development in the context of protecting aquifers from subsurface contamination. I anticipate robust and spirited discussions after my lecture with both those that support development and those that are skeptical.”    Fleckenstein’s talk is titled “Shale Development – Does Cheap Energy Really Mean Flaming Tap Water?”. The lecture will examine the risk of contamination of aquifers through well-bores, primarily based on a comprehensive three-year study funded by the National Science Foundation. Shale development in the US has been ongoing for at least the last decade, and many lessons can be learned from the US experience to help prevent air emissions and aquifer contamination in future developments around the world.    The SPE Distinguished Lecturer program was created in 1961. Each year, the SPE Distinguished Lecturer Committee selects a group of professionals from various disciplines, nominated by their peers, to share their knowledge and expertise with SPE members through visits to SPE sections worldwide. More than 450 presentations are offered each year, and each section can receive up to three lectures per year.   Contact: Agata Bogucka, Communications Manager, College of Earth Resource Sciences & Engineering | 303-384-2657 | abogucka@mines.edu   Announcement
Feb
07
2017

CBE's Carolyn Koh recognized for Department of Energy task force work

Chemical and Biological Engineering Professor Carolyn Koh, who holds the William K. Coors Distinguished Chair, has been recognized for her service on the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board's Task Force on Methane Hydrates. "During my tenure as secretary, SEAB has been prolific in providing sound, actionable advice on various topics of importance to DOE and its mission objectives," said Ernest Moriz in a letter to Koh dated January 15, 2017. Moriz served as secretary of energy under President Barack Obama from May 2013 to January 2017. "Your work provided a framework for DOE's pre-commercial methan hydrate research efforts and encouraged strengthening industry engagement through our advisory committee and continuing international collaborations," Moriz said. Koh is a leading expert on the study of natural gas hydrates, compounds in which a large amount of methane can be trapped within a crystal structure of water, forming ice-like solids. These gas hydrate solids present a potential hazard to the oil and gas industries when they form in underwater flowlines, and also have potential applications in energy recovery, transport, and storage. Koh was one of 10 members of the task force, which issued its report in January 2016. The task force found that extracting methane from hydrate reservoirs could mean less carbon emissions than other fossil sources. They recommended that the Department of Energy continue to fund research into methane hydrates, with one-third devoted to fundamental science and the rest used for U.S. participation in international hydrates activities. The group also recommended increased engagement with industry and academia, and that research priority for field experiments be placed on questions involving the production of hydrates, such as understanding the instabilities that can arise during production. Announcement
Jan
23
2017

MME PhD candidate awarded scholarship for recycling research

Thomas Boundy, a PhD candidate in metallurgical and materials engineering, has been awarded the Recycling Research Foundation's 2016 National Scholarship. Boundy's graduate research is focused on developing a flow sheet that would enable the economical recycling of indium (a rare metal critical to solar panel manufacturing) from cell phones, computer monitors, and television screens. The scholarship awards $5,000 to a student seeking a graduate degree in a field that supports the scrap processing and recycling industry. The Recycling Research Foundation, a nonprofit closely associated with the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, seeks to promote the art and science of scrap processing and recycling through research, sponsorships, technical assistance and educational programs. "The Recycling Research Foundation is proud to honor Thomas Boundy with this scholarship as he pursues an education that will well-prepare him for a future in the recycling industry," said ISRI President Robin Wiener. "One of the goals of this scholarship is to generate interest in recycling careers and there is no doubt that with the knowledge he gains from his education, Thomas will be able to make significant long-lasting contributions to the recycling industry." "I am grateful to be awarded the Recycling Research Foundation’s National Graduate Scholarship and for the support it provides for those seeking higher education that I fully expect will improve the nation’s scrap processing capabilities," said Boundy, who is advised by Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Professor Patrick Taylor. Announcement
Jan
10
2017

Lange receives Department of Energy grant

Dr. Ian Lange, assistant professor with the Division of Economics and Business and director of the Mineral and Energy Economics program, was awarded funding from the Department of Energy in conjunction with Resources for the Future to study the impact of federal coal leasing policy on (non-federal) Eastern coal mine operations. The proposed project will determine whether existing coal mines close prematurely due to leasing and permitting factors for new mines. The analysis will compare mines located on different land tenure (federal, state, and private), with differential access to power plants (minemouth, competition from other basins), and under different economic conditions (price of substitute fuels, number of plant retirements). A number of measures of mine health will be utilized (productivity, current recoverable reserves, proxies for investments made) as indicators for the economic health of the mine which are tied to closing decisions. Announcement
Jan
05
2017

Materials science PhD student receives Goldstein Scholar Award

John Mangum, a PhD candidate in materials science, has been awarded the Goldstein Scholar Award, which will help fund his travel to North Carolina State University to study Ti valence states at atomic scale using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The award, sponsored by the Meteoritical Society and Springer, seeks to promote career advancement for early career members of the Microanalysis Society, increase interactions of junior and established microanalysts, and advance microanalysis measurements. Mangum is advised by Brian Gorman, associate professor of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, and is a member of the Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics. Announcement
Dec
20
2016

Enders named 2016 recipient of SEG Ralph W. Marsden Award

Interim Department Head in Geology and Geological Engineering M. Stephen Enders has been selected as the 2016 recipient of the Ralph W. Marsden Award by the Society of Economic Geologists. This award recognizes significant volunteer contributions to the Society, of which Enders has been a member for 35 years.  Enders received his bachelor's degree from Colorado School of Mines, going on to receive master's and doctoral degrees from the University of Arizona. After over 35 years working in the industry, Enders returned to Mines in 2009 to join the Department of Mining Engineering as a research professor. He was named Interim Department Head of Geology and Geological Engineering in 2016. His numerous leadership experience within SEG includes: President of the SEG Foundation in 2007, President of the Society in 2011, International Exchange Lecturer in 2007 and Fundraising Chairman for the SEG 2016 Conference in Cesme, Turkey. He is currently an SEG Honorary Lecturer and Chairman of the Organizing Committee for the SEG 2018 Conference to be held in Keystone, Colorado.   The Ralph. W. Marsden award will be presented to Enders at the 2017 SEG Conference, to be held in Beijing, China September 17-20, 2017.   Contact: Agata Bogucka, Communications Manager, College of Earth Resource Sciences & Engineering | 303-384-2657 | abogucka@mines.edu Announcement
Dec
04
2016

Miller named 2017 recipient of AIME-SME Mineral Industry Education Award

Hugh Miller, an associate prrofessor in the Department of Mining Engineering, has been selected as the 2017 recipient of the AIME-SME Mineral Industry Education Award by the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration. The award recognizes distinguished contributions to the advancement of mineral industry education, and will be presented at the SME 2017 Annual Conference & Expo in Denver, Colorado on February 22, 2017. Miller received both his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Colorado School of Mines, going on to work in the industry for 13 years. Prior to joining the Mines faculty in 2005, Miller spent 6 years teaching at the University of Arizona, having held several leadership roles. He was elected as an SME Distinguished Member in 2012, and currently teaches and conducts research in areas related to project feasibility/valuation, mine design and operations, occupational safety & health, waterjet technology, and excavation engineering.   Contact: Agata Bogucka, Communications Manager, College of Earth Resource Sciences & Engineering | 303-384-2657 | abogucka@mines.edu Announcement
Nov
04
2016

Snieder named SEG Outstanding Educator for 2016

Interim Department Head for the Department of Geophysics Roel Snieder has been named 2016 Outstanding Educator by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists. The Outstanding Educator Award honors individuals for excellence in geophysics education and is awarded to a person who merits such recognition based on educational qualities and contributions that may include: outstanding contributions in teaching of geophysics classes at any educational level; impact on education programs by commitment to excellence in geophysics education; special dedication to advising, supervising and mentoring students; providing extraordinary inspiration to the next generation of geophysics professionals.   Snieder was presented with the award on Oct. 18 during the 2016 SEG Annual Meeting in Dallas, TX. SEG President John Bradford presents Roel Snieder with the Outstanding Educator Award at the 2016 annual meeting. From the SEG website: Snieder is the W. M. Keck Distinguished Professor of Basic Exploration Science at Colorado School of Mines. Snieder has been committed over the past decade to using his talents to educate students and the public. He lectures to not only students in universities but also to representatives of local companies, international industry, public clubs, societies, schools, and other public forums on issues concerning the art of science, future energy portfolios, and how the public can interact and engage to solve some of the world’s most pressing problems.   Read more about Snieder here.   The SEG is the international society of applied geophysics and a not-for-profit organization which aims to promote the science of geophysics as well as the education of applied geophysicists.     Contact: Agata Bogucka, Communications Manager, College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering | 303-384-2657 | abogucka@mines.edu   Announcement
Oct
20
2016

ME faculty win NSF grant for acquisition of E-XPS

Mechanical Engineering Assistant Professor Steven DeCaluwe has been awarded a Major Research Instrumentation grant from the National Science Foundation for acquisition of an Environmental X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy instrument to establish a unique regional facility for exploring behavior of material surfaces in operating and/or reactive environments. The instrument will also be used for training in advanced measurements. This device will enable unparalleled insights at Mines and collaborating institutions across the Rocky Mountain region in a diverse array of material-dependent technologies and scientific fields, including energy storage and conversion, catalyst development, geological interfaces, thin-films, and chemical separation.   Announcement
Oct
07
2016

PhD candidate wins Best Student Paper at International Pipeline Conference

Taylor Jacobs, a PhD candidate in metallurgical and materials engineering, won the award for Best Student Paper at the International Pipeline Conference, held Sept. 26 to 30 in Calgary, Canada. Jacobs, a student in the Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Center, came in second for Best Student Poster Presentation and was nominated for Best Paper for the entire conference. More than 300 papers were presented at the conference. Both his paper and presentation were titled "The Short and Long Term Effects of Elevated Temperature on the Mechanical Properties of Line Pipe Steels." The International Pipeline Conference is organized by volunteers representing international energy corporations, energy and pipeline associations and regulatory agencies. Announcement

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