STEM

The President’s Committee on Diversity hosted the first Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Luncheon on January 17, 2016. In addition to celebrating Dr. King’s work, the event honored Mines community members who are exceptional in their appreciation for diversity and understanding its value on campus.

MLK speech in Friedhoff Hall

What started as a small breakfast gathering in 2004 to celebrate diversity and community on MLK Day has turned into a well-known campus tradition 13 years later. Since 2008, Mines has held a breakfast and an awards ceremony recognizing select members of the Mines community.  Members of the community are nominated for the MLK Recognition Award, and the MLK Day Planning Committee selects the winners.

This year, the inspirational “I have a dream” speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. was broadcast on the monitors in Friedhoff Hall after the recipients received their awards. The moving speech was an ideal way to honor Martin Luther King, Jr. and his movement towards equality and diversity.

The 2017 Martin Luther King, Jr. Recognition Award Recipients are:

Holly Eklund, Teaching Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics. Eklund was nominated by a fellow AMS faculty member for her extensive involvement in the Multicultural Engineering Program. She was described as “not only a mathematics instructor, but also as a friend and mentor to the students in the program.” Eklund is also a valued CSM101 mentor and faculty advisor for the Society of Asian Scientists and Engineers student chapter.

Iker Madera, a senior in Geophysics was nominated by a fellow student because of his “interest in reaching out to children of underrepresented groups to encourage their involvement in STEM.”

Blake Jones, a junior in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering was nominated by a fellow student for his goal is to increase recognition of Out in Science, Technology, Engineering & Math (oSTEM) on campus. He was described as an “advocate for LGBTQ rights, education and inclusion,” as well as “the only student on campus certified to give SafeZone training.”

Nominated by a faculty member, students Hannah Grover, Jessica Deters, Jacquie Feuerborn, Izabel Aguiar and Joanna Clark were selected for their work as executive officers of the campus club, Equality Through Awareness. The goal of the club is to address issues facing minorities in STEM, including gender, ethnic and racial minorities.

MLK "I have a dream..." post cards
To encourage reflection on Dr. King’s powerful words, attendees were asked to complete the sentence “I have a dream…” on postcards, filling in their own desires for equality and social justice.

Contact:
Leah Pinkus, Communications Assistant, Colorado School of Mines lpinkus@mines.edu
Ashley Spurgeon, Editorial Assistant, Mines Magazine | 303-273-3959 | aspurgeon@mines.edu
Agata Bogucka, Communications Manager, College of Earth Resource Sciences & Engineering | 303-384-2657 | abogucka@mines.edu

 
Students from Alameda International Junior/Senior High School visited Colorado School of Mines on December 7 as part of an outreach program aimed at connecting high schools with a diverse student body to Mines—with a focus on earth science. The program, Mining for Talent, was initiated by the Integrated Groundwater Modeling Center (IGWMC) in conjunction with Jefferson County Public Schools and funded by the National Science Foundation. 
 
Professor of Hydrology Kamini Singha, graduate students from the Hydrologic Science and Engineering Program and staff from the IGWMC led the group throughout the day, which included hands-on lab activities, interactive demos, a scavenger hunt in the Geology Museum and more.
 
“I really want to provide opportunities for some of our local high schools with students underrepresented in earth science to see what we all do here,” said Singha. “These kids are bright and motivated, and starting to think about college. Mines might be the kind of place some of them would consider, especially when they see all we can do here.”
 
The students participated in a number of lab activities—from generating earthquakes using smartphones and mapping contamination in the subsurface to exploring the role of biology on geochemical reactions. With each activity, they toured a related campus facility, such as the Earth Mechanics Institute and the Center for Experimental Study of Subsurface Processes, exposing them to the daily activities of these centers.
 
Twelve graduate students from HSE participated in the outreach program. “I’m glad Mines is reaching out to local high schools”, said Annette Hein, who led a campus tour. “I hope we can help these students get excited about science and engineering.”
 
The interactive day ended with an info session aimed at helping the students focus on what they can do in their last years in high school to help them get into the college of their choice.
 
Travis Ramos, a new graduate student in HSE who just earned his bachelor's from Mines, led a presentation on what a day in the life of a college student looks like. “College is truly a time to empower yourself to make an impact in the world,” said Ramos. “I wanted most of all for them to know that college will help them explore their interests, discover their passions and provide a platform for them to excel in life.”
 
This program will be funded through NSF for another year, and Singha and the IGWMC are looking into other opportunities to engage diverse students on campus. 
 
See more photos from the day here.
 
Contact:
Agata Bogucka, Communications Manager, College of Earth Resource Sciences & Engineering | 303-384-2657 | abogucka@mines.edu
Mark Ramirez, Communications Manager, College of Applied Science & Engineering | 303-384-2622 | ramirez@mines.edu

 

 

Seven students from the winning senior design team, Pig Patrol. Mechanical Engineering

Pig Patrol, a team of seven mechanical engineering seniors at Colorado School of Mines, received first place in the College of Engineering and Computational Sciences Fall Senior Design Trade Fair on December 1, 2016. They designed an integrated cleaning and inspection pig (ICIP) that can collect data more frequently and affordably, without interrupting the pipeline flow.

“Pigging” is a common term in pipeline management, referring to devices known as “pigs” that perform maintenance operations. The name originally referred to the squealing noise the early devices made while traveling in the pipe.

“Basically we need to find defects along the inside of oil pipelines so that pipes don’t rupture,” explained team member Kyle Crews. “We designed a robot that can travel along the inside of the pipeline, find the defects and report them back using a unique sensor that could have a big impact on this market. Our design allows for more frequent testing in a cost-effective way.”

The team is working to possibly take to market the sensor technology that they adapted in the design of their pig. The team’s design acquires lower quality data but in a higher quantity that would allow companies to run the ICIP every time the pipeline is cleaned, rather than every couple of years.

“We have a really close-knit team,” said Crews, “and want to take this forward after graduation, even though several of us are moving out of state. We’ve had a lot of great feedback from people in the industry. We also want to thank our client, Craig Champlin, and our faculty advisor, Jered Dean, who really guided us along over the past two semesters.”

The +4 Designs team received second place for their design of an adjustable down-hole probe-centralizer to be used in geophysical testing by their client, Mount Sopris Instruments. The third place team, Dynamic Hydration Systems, created a hydration system intended for endurance auto racing drivers. They built and tested a system that delivers hydration to the driver without detracting from the driver’s focus through a refillable and detachable component.

Other projects included two for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, one developing an online method for measuring the residence time distribution for a biofuel pre-treatment reactor and the other an instrumentation system to determine the physical level and density of process material inside a thermochemical hydrolysis reactor.

Several teams presented projects aimed at improving Mines’ campus, such as an electrical system aimed at allowing the Starzer Welcome Center to function for 48 hours during an interruption of service and another that looked at better stormwater management through the use of green infrastructure.

For the second time, a Mines senior design team constructed a hands-on educational device for the Boulder Journey School. The human-powered water system is designed to introduce children to cause-and-effect relationships via the use of gears, pulleys and other mechanical devices.

Mines Formula Society of Automotive Engineers also presented an aerodynamic design for the car they will use in their 2017 competition in Nebraska. Students from Mines Human Centered Design Studio presented early prototypes of their adaptive equipment designs, even though they will be competing in the spring trade fair. 

More information about all the teams can be found on the Capstone site. Photos from the event are available on Flickr and via the slideshow below.

2016 Fall Capstone Trade Fair

 

Trade Fair Winners

1st Place – Pig Patrol – Integrated Cleaning and Inspection Pipeline Pigging Robot

Students: Logan Nichols, Evan Marshall, Grant DeShazer, Evan Thomas, Matthew Atherton, Victoria Steffens, Kyle Crews

Client: Craig Champlin

Adivsor: Jered Dean

Consultant: John Steele
 

2nd Place – +4 Designs – Adjustable Downhole Centralizer

Students: Steven Blickley, Nick Markel, Jenevieve Parker, Steven Staszak

Clients: Mount Sopris Instruments: Curtis Baker, Jody DuMond

Advisor: Buddy Haun

Consultants: Jered Dean

 

3rd Place – Dynamic Hydration Systems - Endurance Auto Racing Hydration System Challenge

Students: Will Bennett, Matt Craig, Jaime DuBois, Kaan Korkmaz, Allen Jackson, Ry Walter

Client: Scott Durham

Advisor: Robin Steele

Consultants: Robert Amaro

 

Broader Impacts Essay Winners

1st Place - “Are Electric Vehicles More Brown than Green?” by Kelly Dempsey

2nd Place – “Learning to Drive” by Ben Koehler

3rd Place – “The Broader Impacts of Design Choices in the Airline Industry” by Connor Groeneweg

 

CONTACT:

Deirdre Keating, Communications Manager, College of Engineering & Computational Sciences | 303-384-2358 | dkeating@mines.edu
Ashley Spurgeon, Editorial Assistant, Mines magazine | 303-273-3959 | aspurgeon@mines.edu

 

 
The front cover of "They Joy of Science".Geophysics Professor and Interim Department Head Roel Snieder has coauthored “The Joy of Science: Seven Principles of Scientists Seeking Happiness, Harmony, and Success,” a book focused on helping scientists have a productive and fulfilling career by encouraging them to focus on the positive and minimize stress.
 
The book is now being used as a part of new faculty orientation at Mines and in several workshops held for the greater campus community.
 

“Let go of the concept of balance—instead, think of it as harmony,” Snieder told faculty and staff at a recent workshop. The faculty and staff were asked to complete a worksheet that had them weigh what they balance in life. Some examples were “e-mail vs. everything else,” “exercise vs. work” and “demands of the outside world vs. internal ambitions.”
One of the illustrations from the book, all done by Roel's brother, Janwillem Snieder. "Working under the commonly held belief that no matter how hard we work, it is never enough."
One of the illustrations from the book, all done by Roel's brother, Janwillem Snieder. "Working under the commonly held belief that no matter how hard we work, it is never enough." 

Snieder explained that rather than struggling to achieve the “balance” between things that may never come into line, we should instead aim to achieve “harmony,” the first principle outlined in the book.

A key point that Snieder and coauthor Jen Schneider, a former Mines faculty member, emphasize in the book is the idea that most of these stresses can be eliminated by a change in attitude.
 
“A lot of this is driven by our belief system,” explained Snieder in an interview. “For scientists, the belief system is—can be—very normative and weighing down on them. For example, there is this wide-held belief that you can only contribute if you’re the best—you have to be the best.”
 
Scientists and academics are inherently vying to be the best and putting themselves down if they are not, said Snieder. This is a huge problem in the scientific community because oftentimes you will end up with someone doing really important research, but it might never get out due to this lack of courage. 
 
“The fact that you can do something better, does not mean you’re not doing a good job,” Snieder told the group at the workshop. Ken Osgood, director of the McBride Honors Program at Mines, was one of the attendees.
 
“Roel has a marvelous and infectious perspective on life,” said Osgood. “'The Joy of Science' reflects that.  His book is a recipe for revitalizing so much of what we do – not just our work, research and teaching, but the quality and depth of thought that informs how we do these things.”
 
Although the book is targeted at scientists, its guiding principles are something that can be applied to a much broader community. The idea that one should focus on the positive impact one makes in one’s work rather than constantly overburdening oneself with stress from “not doing enough” is something everyone can learn from. 
 
Contact:
Agata Bogucka, Communications Manager, College of Earth Resource Sciences & Engineering | 303-384-2657 | abogucka@mines.edu

Mark Ramirez, Communications Manager, College of Applied Science & Engineering | 303-384-2622 | ramirez@mines.edu

 
On Oct. 22, 45 Boy Scouts from various troops in the Denver Area Council came to Mines to learn about economic minerals, mine safety, environmental stewardship and the mining industry in Colorado. 

Boy Scouts working to earn their Mining in Society merit badges with SME at Mines.

The event was led by the Mines student chapter of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME), in conjunction with local members of the Minerals Education Coalition.
 
“The Boy Scouts and Mines have been doing this for several years,” said Evan McCombs, campus relations chair for Mines' SME chapter. “This was the largest class of scouts taking the Mining in Society merit badge class from an SME student chapter ever in the U.S.” 
 
Nearly a dozen SME members volunteered to teach scouts about the history of mining and why it remains important today, as well as the future of the industry. The day included a trip to Mines’ Geology Museum, where the scouts saw minerals from many of the mining districts in Colorado, as well as gems from around the world.
 
To give the scouts an even more hands-on experience, SME brought them to the Edgar Experimental Mine in Idaho Springs the following weekend. The boys were given the opportunity to see all the elements of a working mine and discover how mining has developed from the 1860s to today. 
 
After two exciting weekends of immersive learning, the merit badges awarded to the scouts were certainly well deserved. 
 
SME expects to see the number of scouts double at next year’s event, and is also considering offering another merit badge class in the spring, depending on the demand. 
 
“Colorado’s rich mining history is simply fascinating to these youngsters,” said McCombs, “just as it is to the students of SME.” 
 
 
Story and photos courtesy of Evan McCombs, Mining Engineering Class of 2018; edited by Agata Bogucka and Mark Ramirez.
 
Contact:

Agata Bogucka, Communications Manager, College of Earth Resource Sciences & Engineering | 303-384-2657 | abogucka@mines.edu

Mark Ramirez, Communications Manager, College of Applied Science & Engineering | 303-384-2622 | ramirez@mines.edu

 


[Updated Nov. 2, 2016]

Mineral and Energy Economics MS students Bansidhar Bandi, James Crompton, Martin Kohn, Ashwin Ravichandran and David Rodziewicz finished in the top four at the “Energy in Emerging Markets Case Competition,” Nov. 1 at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business as part of the university’s “Energy Week.”

They beat several Ivy League schools to make it to the final round where they competed against Johns Hopkins (first place), Washington University at St. Louis (second place), and Carnegie Mellon (third place).

The goal of the one-day competition is to connect students, academia and industry stakeholders and come up with creative solutions to address real energy challenges affecting the developing world. By encouraging this spirit of innovation, the competition identifies emerging future leaders of the energy industry. The 2016 challenge examined the changes taking place in Cuba’s energy landscape. Teams presented their solutions to a panel of industry leaders and competed for $10,000 in prizes.

Approximately 30 submissions from schools worldwide were received. Of these 30 institutions, 12 were selected for the final round. The Mines MEE students were among an elite group – other schools competing in the finals included Columbia, Duke, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Cornell, UNC Chapel Hill - Kenan-Flagler Business School, University of Maryland, University of Pittsburgh - Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business, and Yale.

The students weren't the only ones representing Colorado School of Mines at Duke Energy Week. Mines alum Mauricio Gutierrez, '99 MS Mineral Economics and Chief Executive Officer at NRG in Princeton, NJ was one of the keynote speakers at the Duke University Energy Conference. 

Learn more about the competition and participants by visiting EnergyWeekatDuke.org.

About Mineral and Energy Economics at Mines
Founded in 1969, this world-renowned program in the Division of Economics Business leads to MS and PhD degrees in Mineral and Energy Economics. This program attracts students from all over the world, and Mines MEE alumni are known globally for their career achievements and qualifications. Students gain the skills necessary for understanding the complex interactions of markets and policy that influence the energy, mineral and environmental industries. The program focuses on applied quantitative tools and models that form a foundation for sound business and public policy. Learn more about Mines’ Mineral and Energy Economics MS and PhD programs.

Photo: Mineral and Energy Economics MS students James Crompton, Ashwin Ravichandran, Bansidhar Bandi, David Rodziewicz and Martin Kohn finished in the top four at the “Energy in Emerging Markets Case Competition,” Nov. 1 at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business as part of the university’s “Energy Week.”

CONTACT
Kelly Beard, Communication Specialist, Division of Economics and Business, Colorado School of Mines | 303-273-3452 | kbeard@mines.edu
Agata Bogucka, Communications Manager, College of Earth Resource Sciences and Engineering | 303-384-2657 | abogucka@mines.edu

On Wednesday, September 14, the White House will host a summit on Computer Science for All, marking progress on expanding computer science (CS) education and celebrating new commitments in support of the effort. Colorado School of Mines is a key member of the initiative and will be doubling its outreach to CS educators in 2017.

Mines has formed a strong partnership with the Front Range Computer Science Teachers’ Association (CSTA) to improve K-12 computer science education in Colorado. Under this new initiative, Mines has committed to recruit, engage and train over 100 Colorado teachers in computer science content and pedagogy during the next year, doubling last year’s outreach. Mines will also offer ongoing support to all new computer science teachers in the state who request support.

Mines and Front Range CSTA will continue working together to create a thriving community of Colorado computer science teachers in order to offer both mutual support and the opportunity to share curriculum and best practices. Mines also commits to helping prepare over 300 K-12 educators from around the country to teach CS courses by hosting CSPdWeek next summer.

These commitments build on Mines efforts to improve CS education in Colorado and the country. In 2015, the Division of Computer Science created C-START: Colorado – STrategic Approach to Rally Teachers, which aims to improve the skills of existing computer science teachers in Colorado. The division also ran two coding camps for middle school students and hosted the 2016 CSPdWeek.

Computer Science for All (CSforAll) is a White House initiative to empower all American students from kindergarten through high school to learn computer science and be equipped with the computational thinking skills they need to be creators in the digital economy, not just consumers, and to be active citizens in our technology-driven world. Our economy is rapidly shifting, and both educators and business leaders are increasingly recognizing that computer science has become a basic skill necessary for economic opportunity and social mobility.

For more on the National Science Foundation’s “Computer Science for All” (CSforAll) program, visit www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/csed/csforall.jsp

To view the White House summit via livestream, visit www.whitehouse.gov/live from 1–3 p.m. on September 14. 

 

Middle school participants and Mines CS student leaders at the 2016 Exploring Tech Camp.

 

Contact:

Deirdre Keating, Communications Manager, College of Engineering & Computational Sciences | 303-384-2358 | dkeating@mines.edu
Anica Wong, Communications Specialist, CSM Foundation | 303-273-3904 | acwong@mines.edu

In a state with an energy economy as purple as its politics, it can be hard to decide where to stand.

The Payne Institute for Earth Resources at Colorado School of Mines teamed up with Inside Energy to host Spark! Unpacking the Politics of Energy in Colorado on Sept. 8 at Mines' Ben H. Parker Student Center.

The Payne Institute and Inside Energy explored everything Colorado’s energy portfolio stands to lose, gain or change in the 2016 election. Journalists from Inside Energy pressed a panel of experts on critical energy issues to help the public make their own decisions in November.

The panel included Ian Lange, PhD, Mineral and Energy Economics Program Director, Division of Economics and Business, Colorado School of Mines; Tracee Bentley, Executive Director, Colorado Petroleum Council; Meghan Nutting, Vice President of Policy and Government Affairs, Sunnova; and Lee Boughey, Senior Manager, Communications and Public Affairs, Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association.

“This panel coversed a wide variety of the Colorado energy landscape,” says Dr. Lange. “It was exciting to hear the views of my fellow panelists and share my thoughts on how Colorado could be impacted by the policies on the ballot this fall.”

Read a recap and view photos from the event.

Visit EarthPolicy.Mines.edu for more information.

About the Payne Institute at Colorado School of Mines
The mission of the Payne Institute for Earth Resources at Colorado School of Mines is to inform and shape sound public policy related to earth resources, energy and the environment. Its goal is to educate current and future leaders on the market, policy and technological challenges presented by energy, environmental and resource management issues, and provide a forum for national and global policy debate. For more information, visit EarthPolicy.Mines.edu.

About Inside Energy
Inside Energy is a collaborative journalism initiative among public media with roots in Colorado, Wyoming and North Dakota. It is funded by a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Its mission, in collaboration with its partner stations, is to create a more informed public on energy issues. Inside Energy seeks to make energy issues a household topic and to inspire community conversations on the topic of energy. Learn more at InsideEnergy.org.

Contact:
Kelly Beard, Communication Specialist, Division of Economics and Business, Colorado School of Mines | 303-273-3452 | kbeard@mines.edu
Kathleen Morton, Digital Media and Communications Manager, Colorado School of Mines | 303-273-3088 | kmorton@mines.edu

Water-Energy Education for the Next Generation, a Colorado School of Mines Research Experience for Teachers sponsored by the National Science Foundation, kicked off its first summer training with nine teachers from Colorado public schools. The six-week summer program focused on impacting K-12 STEM curricula by infusing standards-based, active-learning lessons with current research in the water-energy nexus.

                                 

Left to Right: Stephanie Spiris, Melissa McVey, Professor Timothy Strathmann, Renee Adams-Lee, Associate Professor Chris Higgins, Jill-Maria Kuzava, Assistant Professor Chris Bellona, Patricia Brandenburger, Professor Terri Hogue, WE²ST Education & Outreach Specialist Amy Martin, Shannon Garvin, Associate Professor Josh Sharp, Research Assistant Professor Andrea Blaine, Research Associate Cassandra Glenn, Liz Hudd, Julie McLean, Professor Tzahi Cath, and Amy Dehne

Participants shared what they learned and how they would apply it in their classrooms in culminating presentations July 22. Melissa McVey, a sixth-grade science teacher at Bell Middle School in Golden, credited the faculty and graduate students she worked with for new ideas on how to incorporate lessons on biomagnification and contaminants. She plans to have her students study how plants can improve water quality, and ultimately design and create their own mini-wetland.

                                       
Melissa McVey shares insights gathered during her summer research experience at Mines.

Patricia Brandenburger, an eighth-grade STEM teacher at Deer Creek Middle School in Littleton, was similarly enthusiastic about the program, saying, “I learned a lot about hydrology, geology and geochemistry, which has made me rethink the way I want to teach our energy transformation unit.”

WE²NG is an outreach component of the ConocoPhillips Center for a Sustainable WE²ST, led by Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Terri Hogue and Research Assistant Professor Andrea Blaine. The program included technical, professional and pedagogical training, as well as weekly field trips to connect teachers with industry contacts. WE²NG will continue collaborative relationships with the teacher participants throughout the academic year.

Blaine hopes to see the program evolve and include even more local teachers next summer. “This first cohort of teachers has set the bar high,” said Blaine.  She also expressed her hope that the collaboration between K-12 teachers, Mines faculty and industry leaders will change the way STEM education is delivered. Blaine added, “I believe that a systemic, sustained method of bringing real and exciting science problems into the classroom could revolutionize the way the next generation of scientists addresses critical issues.”

 

Contact:

Deirdre Keating, Communications Manager, College of Engineering & Computational Sciences | 303-384-2358 | dkeating@mines.edu
Mark Ramirez, Communications Manager, College of Applied Science & Engineering | 303-384-2622 | ramirez@mines.edu

Colorado School of Mines and Lockheed Martin hosted 150 students from five local high schools on campus Feb. 23 to celebrate National Engineers Week. Students spent the day touring research centers including the Center for Space Resources, Mines Geology Museum, Advanced Water Technology Center, ConocoPhillips Center for a Sustainable WE2ST, the Colorado Fuel Cell Center and the Critical Materials Institute (CMI).

“The beauty of being able to lead a tour through the Geology Museum while discussing Critical Materials, is that you are able to impress upon visitors a better understanding of the complex network of global mineral resources, their susceptibility to supply chain disruption, the importance of minerals in our future, and the dire need for continued advancement of technologies through research,” said geology graduate student Mandi Hutchinson. “It is really great to see in the future workforce a cognitive recognition of these concepts.  That’s what I saw in the gazes of many of our high school visitors.”

Twenty-five Lockheed Martin engineers and Mines alumni participated in a luncheon roundtable mentoring session focused on career mentorship where they shared advice on discipline, teamwork, study skills and work/life balance.

“Engineering is a building block of society, and at Lockheed Martin we’re engineering a better tomorrow by developing new solutions for our customers toughest challenges,” said Mark Pasquale, vice president of Engineering and Technology at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company. “This week we’re celebrating our brilliant engineers who are solving some of the world’s most difficult challenges, and we are committed to inspiring future generations to pursue STEM careers for missions to Mars and beyond.”

National Engineers Week is Feb. 21-27. The event aims to celebrate how engineers make a difference in our world, increase public dialogue about the need for engineers and bring engineering to life for kids, educators, and parents.

 

Contact:
Kathleen Morton, Digital Media and Communications Manager, Colorado School of Mines / 303-273-3088 / kmorton@mines.edu
Karen Gilbert, Director of Public Relations, Colorado School of Mines / 303-273-3541 / kgilbert@mines.edu

Jeanette Alberg, Manager, Community Relations, Lockheed Martin / 303-977-5841 / jeanette.a.alberg@lmco.com
Gary Napier, Communications Manager, Lockheed Martin / 303-971-4012 / gary.p.napier@lmco.com

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